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About Turks & Caicos

The Turks and Caicos islands, which were said to have been discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1492, were claimed by several European powers before the British secured control of them.  The islands were never actually settled until the late 1600s, when a group of Bermudian salt collectors established a foothold there.  Loyalists leaving the newly-born United States during the late 1700s also made a settlement at Turks & Caicos.

 

The British authorities made the Turks & Caicos an administrative part of its Jamaica colony during the 1870s, which continued until 1959 (when it was made a separate colony).  With the islands being declared a Crown Colony in 1962, the Turks & Caicos eventually went through a period of self-government, until a political scandal compelled the UK to directly run the islands’ affairs again in 2009.

 

Visitors will be surprised to learn that, despite the fact that these islands are still British colonies, the U.S. dollar is the official currency there (presumably to facilitate the tourism industry).  For tourists passing through this part of the Caribbean, they will learn that the Turks and Caicos consist of 40 different islands and cays, only 8 of which are inhabited.  The islands of the Turks and Caicos are almost as diverse as its people. From the main tourist center of Providenciales to the quiet and tranquil islands of North and Middle Caicos to the historic Capital Island of Grand Turk; each one offers a different experience and a unique character but all offer year round great climate, beaches and underwater activities.

 

The only true way to experience the Turks and Caicos Islands is to experience each island in the entire chain. This is probably why most of the visitors come back to the Turks and Caicos on a regular basis. You can read about each of the islands here and maybe pick a few to see on your vacation either for daytrips, or longer stays.

Most of the islands are only about 10 to 25 minutes by air from Provo and most can be reached by boat, too. There are also regular ferries from North to Middle Caicos.